The Billings Outpost

Barbecue competition draws top cooking teams

MONTANAFAIR

If you are a master of meat; the purveyor of the pits; or the king or queen of kabobs, the 2014 MontanaFair is looking for you.

Enter the Montana State BBQ Championship on Aug. 12-13 at MontanaFair. Go to www.MontanaFair.com for entry information or to become a certified judge.

The event is one of the most anticipated and yummiest events every year. Professional and amateur barbecue competition teams from across Montana and the nation compete for glory and a share of more than $10,000 in prize money.

This year’s contest is part of the Rocky Mountain BBQ Association Cup Challenge, providing for more teams, more prize money, and more good barbecue. Teams will compete in four meat categories: Chicken, pork, pork ribs and beef brisket. 

Entry deadline is August 8.

Following the judging on Wednesday, Aug. 13, barbecue competitors may choose to offer samples for sale from 2-5 p.m. that evening. “MontanaFair Bones Bucks” will be available for sale and tasting samples will be sold for one “Buck” per taste.

There’s even a Kid’s Q competition for children 6-16 with nearly $500 in prize money available. Rules state that an adult must accompany the children, but the children have to do all the preparation, seasoning and cooking on their own. Judges will award prizes and premiums in the contest for first to 10th place using Kansas City Barbeque Society scoring (blind judging).

The Montana State BBQ Championship is sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbeque Society. KCBS is the largest organization of barbecue and grilling enthusiasts in the world with more than 14,000 professional members. Certified KCBS judges are used in the competition and the judging certification class is Aug. 11 at MontanaFair.

Last Updated on Friday, 08 August 2014 11:46

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Extension celebrates centennial

MONTANAFAIR

Yellowstone County MSU Extension Service, will recognize the national 100 year anniversary of Extension during MontanaFair. Join us for cake, Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, at 1:30 p.m. near the Community Stage in front of the Expo Building.

In 1914, the Smith-Lever Act established the National Cooperative Extension system and Montana is part of it. Extension’s roots go back even further to 1862 with the signing of the Morrill Act. This act made it possible for new western states to establish colleges for their citizens. The new land-grant institutions, which emphasized agriculture and mechanic arts, opened opportunities to thousands of farmers and working people previously excluded from higher education.

Extension provides unbiased, research-based education programs and information to strengthen the social, economic and environmental well-being of Montana citizens.

The purpose of Extension is “better farming, better living, more happiness, more education, and better citizenship” for the “entire country.”

For more information contact Roni Baker, Yellowstone County 4-H/Youth Extension Agent at 256-2828.

Last Updated on Friday, 08 August 2014 11:46

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Top cowboys, cowgirls to compete in rodeo

MONTANAFAIR

World champion cowboys and cowgirls dot the list of competitors at the Yellowstone River Roundup PRCA Rodeo at MontanaFair.

Eleven time and current all-around world champion cowboy Trevor Brazile heads a group of 536 cowboys and cowgirls for the pro rodeo at MontanaFair. Four of the top six cowboys currently at the top of the Windham Weaponry Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association World All Around standings will be showing their stuff at MetraPark.

Fans will see rodeo stars like 2013 PRCA steer wrestling champion Hunter Cure; Texan Tuf Cooper (currently second in the world standings) and two time world champion and Billings native Clay Tryan will be after the title in team roping.

“Increases in the amount of money available for the riders usually increases the number and quality of participants,” said Dutcher. “The efforts of the Cowboy Club and the Yellowstone County Board of Commissioners support will make this rodeo the biggest ever.”

The Cowboy Club was formed to represent and promote rodeo activities at MontanaFair. Todd Buchanan, vice chairman of the Cowboy Club, was present for the announcement.

“It looks like the additional prize money from the club and the county’s financial support will move our rodeo toward our goal of being the biggest and best rodeo in Montana,” said Buchanan.

The payout for the rodeo is up 11 percent from 2013. The Yellowstone River Roundup, sponsored by Shipton’s Big R, is Aug. 14, 15 and 16 at the Grandstands at MetraPark.

Last Updated on Friday, 08 August 2014 11:47

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ArtWalk expands to 27 venues on Friday

The Summer ArtWalk in Downtown Billings will be Friday, Aug. 1, from 5-9 p.m.

Twenty-seven venues will be open for receptions featuring local and regional artists.

Highlights of the Artwalk will include:

• The Save the Murals committee members from Billings Senior High School will be at Sandstone Gallery and Toucan Gallery with information on their fundraising events in order to restore and preserve more than 100 murals on their school’s walls.

• Anderson Art Studio & Gallery will feature paintings of East Rosebud Lake by Laura Anderson. Laura and her husband, Karl Morledge, were caretakers of the East Rosebud Lake Association from 2005-2010. Living at this isolated lake, Laura experienced everything from bright sunny days to days with 130 mph winds and captured it all in her artwork.

• Connie Dillon’s new gallery will feature a selection of large framed format photographs and small 6-by-6-inch paintings of interiors framed in shadow boxes with miniatures that complement the scenes. She will also offer photo cards, handmade journals and keepsake boxes by John Felten.

• RiverStone Health’s Lil Anderson Center will show photographs of Montana scenery, flowers and animals in the wild by Drs. Mike Geurin, Mike Downing and Rory Rogina.

• Global Village welcomes young artists from the 14th annual Summer Art Academy held at Rocky Mountain College on June 9-13. Kites, watercolors, acrylics, drawings, jewelry, costume designs and prints are among the creations on display from the young artists (ages 8-14) who attended the camp. Refreshments will be provided by Velvet Cravings.

• Sandstone Gallery will feature the pastels of Louise Payovich and the watercolors of Dick Cottril. The gallery’s guest artist will be local watercolor artist, Michiko Conklin.

• Jens Gallery & Design is opening a second location just in time for the August ArtWalk. There is a new show opening at each gallery location. The work of three contemporary female artists, Chris Romine, Jenny Moller and Sue Schuld, will be showcased.

•  Having taught and painted in Indiana for 15 years, Dana Zier, owner of Big Sky Blue Gallery, became inspired by and befriended numerous artists. At various times, all of them painted, created and showed together in Indiana and for the first time they are presenting their work together in Montana. Guest artists include watercolor artist Rena Brouwer; art educators and mother/daughter artistic team Doris Myers and Bonnie Zimmer; sculptor, photographer, oil painter and Billings resident Laura Anderson; local watercolor artist Mary Blain; fiber artist Mary Ann Van Soest; and Zier’s daughter and photographer Margaret Weber.

• McCormick Café will host the Billings Art Association with an all-membership show from Aug. 1 through the end of the month. BAA artists show 60 pieces of their work. Sales of the art will generate funding for art education charitable purposes: BAA Art Education Grant Funding or IMAGE grants. BAA is an organization of 119 artists from this region who gather together to share information and provide education to the members.

• The Northern Hotel will feature in its lobby local artists representing a variety of media including digital photo overlay work on brushed aluminum by native Billings artist Ashley Prange. Her graphic design and ceramics background influence the way she manipulates and builds her work.

• ArtWalkers stopping at the Yellowstone Art Museum will be able to see the exhibit of eight kites and paintings by local artist John Pollock. An art professor at Montana State University Billings from 1974-2010, Pollock has created art that can be found in collections around the country, including the Yellowstone Art Museum’s permanent collection. Admission to the museum is free during ArtWalk.

• The Jason Jam Gallery will present the second annual Super Cute Fun Show, which is an art show of works by Jason and his wife, Wendy.

• Underground Culture Krew will feature its newest gallery member, photographer Ellen Kuntz and her exhibit “Bang” – a series of self-portraits that explores modern day vices in consumer culture. Gallery artists Kristin Rude, Jenna Martin, Gloria Mang, Tina Jensen, Crystal Rieker and five local graffiti artists will also be featured.

•  Billings Open Studio will host numerous events during the Artwalk. “The Tug of War” –  a multimedia collaboration of dance, poetry, acting, spoken word, and canvas artwork produced by over 30 local and national artists – will offer a preview of their premiere Saturday at Billings Open Studio. On display with this installation will be work comprising 30 individual canvases by artist Vincent Severo as well as an abstract triptych created by Kira Fercho. Also at Billings Open Studio, the Rogue Art Gallery will feature works by Cody Meyer, Jenna Christensen, Hollie Paris, Aaron Nathan, and Noah Bourn. In addition, photographers Kristin Carroll, Tony Anderson, Bryce Turcotte, and Ted Kim will show new works as part of their collaborative pop up exhibit, “Music and Motion.”

• Gallery Interiors will feature the figurative drawings of Joseph Booth. Booth was trained as a comic book artist only to find out what he loved about the medium was the figures and not the confined spaces of the panels on a page.

• Susan Germer at Susang will feature silver jewelry, photography, watercolor notecards, bead embroidery and pastels.

• Catherine Louisa Gallery will hold the grand opening of its new space with catering from Bin 119.

• Tompkins Fine Art presents two new artists: Connie Herberg and Mia DeLode. Connie Herberg’s home and studio are in Shepherd. She has a bachelor’s degree in fine art with an emphasis in drawing and sculpture from MSU Billings. Mia DeLode is a fourth-generation rancher from central Montana.

* Stop by the Stephen Haraden Studio to see a selection of his painting collages. Also on view will be “What I Did This Summer,” works done in silk or felt as well as my examples from teaching at the Summer Arts Academy kids camp.

* CTA Architects Engineers will present the CTA Employee Art Show Mixed media work, both 2D and 3D.

* Toucan Gallery will feature the ceramic works of Great Falls artist Don Hanson. Hanson specializes in functional stoneware, dinnerware sets and fine porcelain. A variety of his work will be on display, and Hanson will be in attendance to discuss his work and answer questions.

* The crew at Good Earth Market will be repurposing unwanted items into new works of art.

* In February, Clark Marten was the second person to own an IQ250 back that joins to a Phase One medium format camera. The result was images that are almost 3 times as sharp as a 35mm camera. Since February, he has used the new camera to photograph the aging tools and equipment of his family’s farm. The black and white series will be the centerpiece of his ArtWalk exhibit.

* The first entries in the Salute to Montana Economy will be on display at the Food Bank. The public is invited to come in and see them and also cast their ballots. A champagne reception will be held Friday evening with the announcement of the winner.

The featured artist at the event will be Leland W. Stewart.

Other participating galleries include Chinatown Gallery, Guido’s Pizzeria, Kennedy’s Stained Glass and Trulove Studio.

Last Updated on Thursday, 31 July 2014 09:37

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Elderly Butte man loses $2,400 in phone scam

SENIORS

By JIM LARSON - The Billings Outpost

A phone caller stole more than $2,400 from an elderly Butte man last week.

The man received a call from a person pretending to represent the Internal Revenue Service.

The caller told the man that he had been audited and that he owed the IRS roughly $2,700, Undersheriff George Skuletich told reporters at a Friday media briefing.

The caller told the victim that the audit had gone back to 2006, Skuletich said.

The man hung up on the caller. A second call then came.

The voice pretending to be from the IRS then told the man that if he didn’t pay, the man’s wife would be arrested, Skuletich said.

The man went to EDTECH Federal Credit Union where he withdrew more than $2,400.

After withdrawing the funds, the victim went to Albertson’s. 

There he was instructed by the caller to purchase three “Reloadit” gift cards. The cards were loaded while the man was on the phone with the scam artist, the undersheriff said.

The man was then instructed to give his PIN to the caller. The victim complied.

Once the PIN was revealed to the caller, the funds became untraceable, the undersheriff said.

The victim’s ordeal was not over at that point.

The caller told him that the transaction had not gone through. He instructed the elderly man to try again.

The man returned to EDTECH Federal Credit Union. There he attempted to withdraw the sum again.

At that point, the credit union called the police.

The responding officers told the man that he had been defrauded.

The police contacted Reloadit. The company confirmed that once the PIN is given to someone else, the transaction becomes untraceable.

Realoadit is a service that allows customers to add funds to a prepaid debit card.

The phone scam was attempted at least three times during the week, the undersheriff said.

The defrauded victim was 83 years old.

Last Updated on Friday, 25 July 2014 11:48

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Red Cross urgently calls for blood, platelet donors

SENIORS

The American Red Cross is facing a looming blood shortage, leading to an urgent need for donors of all blood types to roll up a sleeve and give.

Donations through the Red Cross are down approximately 8 percent over the last 11 weeks, resulting in about 80,000 fewer donations than expected. The number of donors continues to decline, and the shortfall is significant enough that the Red Cross could experience an emergency in the coming weeks.

In addition, the Independence Day holiday falling on Friday reduced the number of blood drives scheduled in early July. Many sponsors did not host drives because people took vacations either over the long weekend or for the entire week. In an average summer week, about 4,400 Red Cross blood drives are scheduled, compared to Independence Day week when only 3,450 drives occurred.

“Hospital patients continue to need lifesaving blood this summer, and they’re relying on the generosity of volunteer donors to give them hope in the days and weeks ahead,” said Julia Wulf, chief executive officer for the Red Cross Lewis and Clark and Arizona Blood Services Region. “Please, consider giving the gift of life. Each day donations come up short, less blood is available for patients in need – and you never know when it could be your loved one needing blood.”

Eligible donors with types O negative, B negative and A negative blood are especially needed at this time. Type O negative is the universal blood type and can be transfused to anyone who needs blood. Types A negative and B negative can be transfused to Rh positive or negative patients.

There is also an urgent need for platelet donations. Platelets – a key clotting component of blood often needed by cancer patients, burn victims and bone marrow recipients – must be transfused within five days of donation, so it’s important to have a steady supply of platelets on hand.

The summer can be among the most challenging times of the year for blood and platelet donations as regular donors delay giving while they take vacations and participate in summer activities.

Upcoming Blood Donation Opportunities include two in Lewistown: from noon to 6 p.m. Aug. 4 in Eagles Hall, 124 W. Main St., and from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Aug. 5 at Central Montana Medical Center, 408 Wendell Ave.

Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 11:46

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Hack attack: Half of U.S. adults victim of hacks

SENIORS

Janice from Havre contacted our office with this question:

Q: I am one of the 1.3 million people whose information was compromised as a result of the recent hacking of the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services server. Aside from signing up for the free credit monitoring and insurance that the state is offering to the victims of the data breach, what other things can I do to protect myself in the future?

A: Unfortunately falling victim to online hackers is becoming increasingly inevitable. About 432 million online accounts belonging to 110 million Americans — roughly half of all adults — were hacked in cyber attacks during the past year, according to new findings by the Ponemon Institute, a data-collection research firm.

The risks are so widespread that two-thirds of 3,110 respondents to a Consumer Reports survey said they do nothing to protect themselves — the apathetic result of what experts call data-breach fatigue from the seemingly nonstop parade of high-profile hacking of customer records at Target, Neiman Marcus, Adobe and others.

Bad move. “The most effective defense against an international onslaught of shadowy hackers is a well-informed and vigilant individual,” notes Consumer Reports.

5 things you should do

1. Don’t share anything you don’t have to. That includes your Social Security number at the doctor’s office or on medical forms (if needed, your insurer can provide it); where you live, work, shop or vacation on social media; or any personal or financial information in phone calls or emails you do not initiate.

2. Monitor your financial life. Don’t rely solely on monthly statements from your bank or credit card companies; check account activity online or by phone at least weekly for quick indicators of fraud. Also, do what many Americans don’t: Access your free credit reports every four months at AnnualCreditReport.com.

3. Protect your technology. In addition to using strong and different passwords on different accounts and on all electronic devices, change them frequently (take note, Smartphone users). Take an extra step, too, by checking for updates on security software, just in case not all are automatic.

4. Be a smart shopper. Use a credit card over a debit card when shopping online, traveling, at the gas station and most everywhere else. Never shop (or do any financial transaction, including checking banking or credit card accounts) on public Wi-Fi networks. And when online shopping (ideally from a secure home account), always try to type website addresses yourself; relying on links in emails, advertisements or online searches can take you to a scammer-run site or download malware to your computer. When using your Smartphone to shop, use retailers’ dedicated apps, rather than your phone’s browser.

5. Be skeptical. Those “Dear Customer” emails from retailers with which you do business? They’re likely bogus (they have your name, but do they have your email?), so don’t click on their links. And even with a personalized email, before clicking, hover your computer mouse over the link and you should see a full website address. If it’s not what appears in an email-offered link, assume you’re being directed to a scammer-run website or about to download malware. Don’t trust emails, text messages or phone calls that ask you to confirm recent transactions (legitimate retail sites will send an order confirmation, usually with instructions on how to track the delivery of your purchase, but they will not ask for confirmation). Also beware of “warnings” from your bank asking you to confirm your account; look up the phone number yourself if you’re worried.

The best defense against hackers? You!

If you’ve been scammed, notify local law enforcement and the Montana Attorney General’s Office of Consumer Protection at 800-481-6896 or via e-mail at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . You may also contact the AARP Foundation Fraud Fighter Center at 877-908-3360.

Go to the AARP Fraud Watch Network at www.aarp.org/FraudWatchNetwork to find out more about prevention of scams and fraud or to sign up for “Watchdog Alerts.”

Do you have a question for AARP Montana? Send your question to “Ask AARP Montana” at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 30 W. 14th St., Helena, MT 59601 or call our toll-free hotline at 866-295-7278. As we receive questions, we will consult with both internal and external experts to provide timely and valuable advice.

 

Last Updated on Friday, 25 July 2014 11:45

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Danger in medicine cabinets

SENIORS

A potentially deadly danger lurks in the medicine cabinets of local seniors this summer. Did you know that heat, when combined with certain medications, can seriously harm seniors?

SYNERGY HomeCare, a non-medical in-home care franchise, recommends that families pay special attention to seniors who are taking any medications this summer.

Considering that some 80 percent to 86 percent of seniors suffer from a chronic condition or disease that requires medication, the summer heat can pose significant challenges.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

• Seniors are more prone to heat stroke and heat-related stress because their bodies can’t adjust to sudden changes in temperature.

• Seniors who take certain prescription medications are more susceptible to heat-related injuries and illnesses.

“During the hot summer months, families really need to pay special attention to their elderly loved ones who are taking medications and may not understand the health risks,” says Rick Basch, president of SYNERGY HomeCare. “We strongly urge families to consult with their doctor or pharmacist regarding the potential impact of heat on any medications.   If family members aren’t available, our Caregivers can be an excellent resource for monitoring any potentially adverse reactions to heat that a senior may experience.”

Prescription for trouble

• Antidepressants and antihistamines act on an area of the brain that controls the skin’s ability to make sweat. Sweating is the body’s natural cooling system. People who can’t sweat are at risk for overheating.

• Beta blockers reduce the ability of the heart and lungs to adapt to stresses, including hot weather. This also increases a person’s risk of heat stroke and other heat related illnesses.

• Amphetamines can raise body temperature.

• Diuretics act on kidneys and encourage fluid loss. This can quickly lead to dehydration in hot weather.

• Sedatives can reduce a person’s awareness of physical discomfort which means symptoms of heat stress may be ignored.

• Ephedrine/Pseudoephedrine found in over-the-counter decongestants decrease blood flow to the skin and impact the body’s ability to cool down.

“We want to do everything we can to ensure that our seniors don’t make the headlines this summer due to heat-related conditions,” says Basch. “Our Caregivers can be a lifesaver (literally), when it comes to keeping seniors well hydrated, cool and comfortable. They’re an extra set of eyes and when it really counts.”

Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 11:32

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2 facilities awarded Bronze

SENIORS

Billings Health & Rehabilitation Community and Westpark Village, A Senior Living Community have been recognized as 2014 recipients of the Bronze -Commitment to Quality National Quality Award for their outstanding performance in the health care profession.

The award, presented by the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living, highlights facilities across the nation that have demonstrated their intention to pursue a rigorous quality improvement system.

“I applaud Billings Health & Rehabilitation Community and Westpark Village for their commitment to delivering quality care,” said Mark Parkinson, president and chief executive officer of AHCA/NCAL. “This award represents the dedication that each Bronze recipient has given to improve quality in the long term and post-acute care profession.”

Implemented by AHCA/NCAL in 1996, the National Quality Award Program is centered on the core values and criteria of the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program.

The program assists providers of long term and post-acute care services in achieving their performance excellence goals.

Billings Health & Rehabilitation Community and Westpark Village were two of only seven Montana facilities to receive the Bronze level award.

The Goodman Group managed communities, The Village Health Care Center and The Village Senior Residence in Missoula, Mont., were also awarded the bronze-level award. The recipient centers will be honored during the AHCA/NCAL’s 65th annual Convention and Exposition, Oct. 5-8, 2014, in Washington, D.C.

Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 11:29

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Jordan country offers prairie magnificence

 Photo by Rick and Susie Graetz The river breaks and badlands north of Jordan.
 
By RICK AND SUSIE GRAETZ - University of Montana - Department of Geography

Late 1800s photographer L. A. Huffman called it “The Big Open,” National Geographic termed it “Jordan Country” and others dubbed the sparsely populated landscape south of Fort Peck Lake “The Big Dry.” The heart of this scenic territory is the small town of Jordan.

Rising from the banks of Big Dry Creek and straddling Montana Highway 200, Jordan was founded in about 1896 by Arthur Jordan. He asked that the town take the name of a friend from Miles City who also was named Jordan. The first residence was Arthur’s tent. Later, he established a post office and store for this fledgling cow town.

The town and surrounding expanse of rangeland still are very much cowboy country, and the place retains an Old West flavor. False front buildings on Main Street – some more than 80 years old – haven’t changed much since the community’s early days.

This seat of Garfield County offers entry into some of the West’s most remote and beautiful mix of deep river canyons, badlands and prairie wilderness. The most rugged terrain is part of Charles M. Russell Wildlife Refuge. Out here, antelope, elk, mule deer, whitetail deer, wild turkeys, sage grouse and numerous waterfowl make these lands their home.

Many roads and trails deliver you into and through this wild country. Before striking out, inquire at the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge in Jordan. They can advise you on conditions and the best routes to follow. It’s very important to get good information to make the most of your time. This is big territory you’ll be wandering into, and a place that will amaze you. It truly is an uncommon landscape and one of the most fantastic wilderness regions of America.

Hell Creek State Park, located on Fort Peck Lake 26 miles north of Jordan, is a popular recreation area. On the way you’ll go through the scenic Piney Buttes and over high rises that offer excellent views of some of the upper reaches of the Missouri Breaks and the CMR Refuge. Outside of Jordan, Devil’s Creek, Snow Creek and Crooked Creek also are worthwhile places to visit. And the Haxby Road, about six miles east of town, reaches a long way through the badlands into the Breaks and the western edge of an area called the Big Dry Arm of Fort Peck Lake. These routes reveal scenic wonders that are among the most magnificent prairie geography in the nation.

The stretch of Missouri River Country from the Fred Robinson Bridge to Fort Peck is a showcase of sandstone creatures and badlands that illustrate evidence of what passed here many millions of years ago. Sections of Garfield (Jordan) and McCone (Circle) counties were home to Tyrannosaurus Rex, Triceratops, Albertosaurus, Mosasaurus (a marine reptile) and other giant creatures. Because of erosion, some of the richest records of prehistoric life in the world have been and continue to be uncovered here. In 1902, one of the first intact T-Rex fossils ever found was discovered near Jordan in the Hell Creek badlands. The Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge is home to much of this dinosaur burial ground.

Some 65 million years ago, when not totally underwater (much of Montana east of the mountains was covered by a shallow inland sea), this area was part of a hot, humid sub-tropical coastline of marshes, rivers and river deltas bearing dense vegetation near the watercourses and grassy plains farther to the west. It was the time of the dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures – the climate and habitat were just right.

Exploring farther from Jordan, head east on Montana Highway 200 towards the town of Circle. Twenty-five miles out, you’ll enter a 10mile stretch of spectacular views with red-and-yellow-colored buttes, badlands and distant vistas. Thirty-six miles from town you’ll encounter Highway 24 pointing north. It parallels the Dry Arm section and eastern edge of Fort Peck Lake. If you’d like to camp, put a boat in the water or just see the lake, take advantage of the recreation areas along the its length. There are several and they are well-marked.

Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 11:22

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