The Billings Outpost

St. V pastoral education receives accreditation

St. Vincent Healthcare has announced that its Clinical Pastoral Education Program has received accreditation by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education Inc. of Decatur, Ga., as a Satellite Program Center.

SV CPE is a satellite of Tri-Cities Chaplaincy in Richland, Wash. The program supervisor of SV CPE is the Rev. Wes McIntyre of Tri-Cities Chaplaincy. The Rev. Terry Hollister is coordinator of ministry formation and CPE at St. Vincent Healthcare.  

SV CPE was granted provisional accreditation in December 2013 and offered its first unit of CPE from February through June 2014. In late April, 2014 the Rev. Beverly Hartz, Accreditation Committee chairwoman, made a site visit to evaluate the program’s compliance with ACPE Accreditation Standards. Based on her findings and upon her recommendation, the ACPE Accreditation Commission took action to approve SV CPE as an accredited Satellite Program Center at its May meeting.  

SV CPE plans to continue offering CPE units in future. An extended unit will be held from October 2014 through May 2015. Eight students will be participating in that unit.

Two of those students will make use of videoconferencing technology as they participate remotely from the two other SCL Heath affiliate hospitals in Montana; Holy Rosary Healthcare, Miles City and St. James Healthcare, Butte. Plans are in progress for a 12-week summer intensive unit, to begin in late May or early June, 2015.

Last Updated on Thursday, 18 September 2014 15:14

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Clinic opens ExpressCare

Billings Clinic’s second ExpressCare retail clinic opened for business in March. Located near the pharmacy in the Billings Heights Albertsons store at 607 Main St., the clinic offers patients quick access to primary care in convenient locations for minor medical issues provided by Billings Clinic nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

Last Updated on Thursday, 18 September 2014 15:12

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For healthier eating, embrace bitter flavors

FLASH IN THE PAN

By ARI LEVAUX

The people who shaped modern food have consistently selected against nutritional value, writes Jo Robinson in her fascinating book, “Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health.” We all know we’re supposed to add vegetables to our diet, she argues, but given the state of modern vegetables, that’s not usually enough. The vegetables you consume should be as nutrient-dense as possible, and as a general rule, the most nutrient dense foods are usually the strongest flavored and least domesticated.

“Early farmers favored plants that were relatively low in fiber and high in sugar, starch and oil,” she writes. These seed savers chose the least bitter specimens to replant, at the expense of their and our health. “It is now known that many of the most beneficial phytonutrients have a bitter, sour or astringent taste,” Robinson writes.

Phytonutrients are biologically active, plant-derived compounds associated with positive health effects, even if they don’t taste too like doughnuts.

If bitter is indeed better, perhaps it’s time we rethink our relationship to this difficult flavor. It’s a shift that might not be as hard as one might think. The first time I tried beer, for example, I thought it was horrible, largely thanks to the bitterness. But as my body began to associate the flavor of beer with getting hammered and hanging out with similarly inebriated coeds, those same bitter beer flavors began to invoke feelings of expectation, comfort and delight.

Something analogous can happen with dietary bitter greens, thanks to a whole-body understanding of how good they will make your body feel. For some, this flavor becomes like the burn from a set of pushups, a la “no pain, no gain.” For others, like my sweetheart, who I’ll call Shorty, bitter is truly sweet. She eats radicchio like some people eat potato chips, dipping the leaves into an oily dressing as she goes. It’s half olive oil, with the other half equal parts soy sauce, balsamic and cider vinegars.

Shorty is the exception. Americans consume more servings of iceberg lettuce per week than all other fresh vegetables combined (not including potatoes), Robinson notes. Iceberg is the poster child for modern agriculture’s nutrient drain. It’s about as bland and non-bitter as water, and nearly as pale as the ice formation it’s named after.

“The most intensely colored salad greens have the most phytonutrients,” Robinson writes. “The most nutritious greens in the supermarket are not green at all but red, purple, or reddish brown. These particular hues come from phytonutrients called anthocyanins ... . Anthocyanins are powerful antioxidants that show great promise in fighting cancer, lowering blood pressure, slowing age-related memory loss, and even reducing the negative effects of eating high-sugar and high-fat foods.”

Taking Robinson’s telltale signs to their logical conclusion, one might expect radicchio, with its dark purple leaves, to be among the most nutritious greens of all. And indeed they are, just a few steps behind radicchio’s wild cousin, the dandelion, which contains an even richer supply of nutrients - just make sure any gathered specimens haven’t been fortified by neighborhood dogs, or with added fertilizers or pesticides. Endive and escarole are also in the same family, as is chicory, their wild progenitor.

If you’re not a bittervore like Shorty, or aren’t the type to make peace with the bitter side of your sustenance, there are some easy ways to soften, obscure, and even put the bitter flavors to work.

Adding chopped dandelion greens or radicchio to a salad of paler, milder leaves like lettuce can add depth to the salad’s flavor, as the mellow leaves dilute the pain. If such a salad is still too bitter for your taste, consider a sweet or creamy dressing, like honey mustard, or even ranch. “Fat is one of the best antidotes to bitterness,” Robinson writes.

Indeed, what isn’t fat the best antidote for?

At the same time, cover-ups like fat and sweet, while making bitter greens palatable, are crutches. They turn eating your greens into a constant uphill battle in which some form of assistance is always required. Embracing the bitter side makes a lot more sense. As you get used to these flavors you’ll be able to distinguish one plant’s subtle flavors from another’s, along with differences in texture, acidity and juiciness. You’ll find variety among the shades of bitter.

Another worthy approach to consuming bitter greens is to combine them with other bitter foods, which can create a bouquet of bitter flavors. This works best with bitter foods that also have redeeming characteristics to counter their inherent bitterness. Walnuts, for example, are astringent, but have a compensating oiliness. Grapefruit’s bitter flavors are balanced with tartness and sweet.

Here’s a salad recipe that blends bitter red and green leaves with grapefruit and walnuts. It’s a bright, unexpected gathering of components, with each one’s bitter side adding to a smooth, bitter bouquet.

Ingredients for four servings:

2 heads radicchio

About the same amount of other greens, such as dandelion, endive, escarole, lettuce or

lambs quarter.

Two or three pink grapefruits

½ cup chopped onion (red, of course)

1 cup walnuts

½ cup olive oil

coarse salt and pepper

optional: smoked or baked salmon, fried scallops, bacon or other protein; perhaps a soft goat

cheese

Directions

On low heat, dry roast the walnuts in a heavy pan, stirring often, for 10 minutes or until they brown. When the nuts cool, crush them.

Peel the grapefruits and separate the fruit from the membrane. Do this over a plate that catches all the juice that drips. Give the fruit a little squeeze so more juice comes out. You want about half a cup for the dressing.

Wash, dry, and chop the radicchio and other leaves, about as finely as coleslaw. Mix with the onions, grapefruit pieces, walnuts and optional animal proteins. Whisk together the olive oil and grapefruit juice, and dress the salad.

Last Updated on Thursday, 18 September 2014 15:11

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How meat cartel arose

BOOK REVIEW

By GILLES STOCKTON

Although at first glance, a book about the development of a fully vertically and horizontally integrated cartel controlling the raising, slaughter and marketing of poultry, pork and beef may seem dry, “The Meat Racket” author Chris Leonard tells a compelling story.

He follows the rise of the Tyson family in the creation of the meat cartel in a balanced and non-inflammatory manner.

Leonard concludes that the handful of companies that now control the production and marketing of all meats can set prices at will.

The disappearance of free markets in agriculture mirrors the disappearance of free and open markets in much of the rest of our economic lives. What Leonard chronicles in the rise of the Tyson family is the banality of evil when it aligns itself to our own petty self-interests. Meat is now produced in a system based on exploitation of everything it touches – the animals, the environment, the contract growers, the plant workers, and ultimately the consumers themselves.

My awakening to the growing threat to the competitive markets for beef came in 1987 when Benny Bunting, a disaffected contract poultry grower from North Carolina, addressed the annual meeting of the Northern Plains Resource Council. He concluded with this warning: “Do not allow yourself to become a serf on your own land.”

“The Meat Racket” is a kind of requiem for the three decades of work and passion that I and many other staff and leaders of WORC have devoted to prevent the “chickenization” of the hog and cattle industries. We organized, we studied the complexity of the issues, and we came to the simple, elegant conclusion — rule — to save the integrity of the hog and cattle markets from what happened to the chicken market: forward delivery contracts for slaughter-ready beef and hogs must be publicly bid.

The rule

It received serious consideration by a number of academics and from U.S. Department of Agriculture leadership. In the end, it was not that the giants were too large and powerful for us to confront but rather that their minions, the “orcs” you might say, were so numerous and pernicious.

After a long battle on many fronts, the rule has never been implemented. Instead, the vertically integrated contract meat production system has become even more entrenched.

Leonard ends his book with the dismal assessment that now that the vertical and horizontal integration of the poultry, hog, and cattle feeding industries is complete, it is not possible to restore the ideal of independent farmers selling their livestock in open competitive markets. For us ranchers and farmers this suggests we accept the fact that we will be nothing but the serfs of our corporate overlords. For consumers, it means higher prices, lower quality, and more safety issues will be our new normal.

However, even though meat, as a commodity, is firmly in the hands of the meatpacking “racket,” they still do not control the market for local, natural, or organic meat. The opportunity for niche producers and for consumers interested in local consumption is viable and growing. The local market network may remain a fraction of the size of the commodity market, but it offers an opportunity for farmers and consumers to collaborate in quality food. That is scant reassurance, however, for most western ranchers because we simply do not have enough local consumers for all of the beef and lamb that we can raise.

But is it all over for us ranchers? It will be if we give up trying to restore free, public, and competitive markets for cattle and sheep. I am not ready to give up and I know many who feel the same as I. If you are interested in food, and concerned about how your food is raised and where it is sourced, you should read The Meat Racket. Then you should join us in the fight to restore free, public, and competitive markets for all agricultural commodities.

Gilles Stockton is a rancher from Grass Range and a member of the Western Organization of Resource Councils, a regional network of conservationists and family farmers and ranchers based in Billings.

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 11 September 2014 13:04

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Wolverines not threatened

CONSERVATION

By DEB COURSON SMITH -Big Sky Connection

MISSOULA – A decision on whether wolverines should be considered “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act took 14 years. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has decided the animals are not imperiled, citing uncertainty about the ecology of the wolverine.

Wolverines are found mainly in areas that receive deep, late-season snow in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho and Washington. Kylie Paul, who has been researching wolverines for several years at Defenders of Wildlife, said wolverines are clearly at risk of extinction - and climate change is part of the problem.

“If we’re not willing to protect a species that has only 250 to 300 individuals,” she said, “one of the rarest mammals in the Lower 48, how imperiled does a species have to get to get federal protection?”

While there may be up to 300 animals, Paul said their reproduction rates are low and it’s estimated that only a few dozen females are able to reproduce each year. Wolverines do survive in higher numbers in Canada.

Paul said wolverines have declined not just because of changing snowpack levels and timing but also because of trapping, loud winter recreation and habitat degradation.

“They’re just this amazing, tenacious animal,” she said. “This native species that we have - it will be on its way out within our lifetime. They need to be able to withstand these issues that face them, now and in the future.”

Wildlife organizations including Defenders requested ESA listing for wolverines in 2000. Fish and Wildlife proposed listing the species as “threatened” last year, mainly because of climate change, but reversed that stance last week.

Details of the decision are  at fws.gov.

Last Updated on Thursday, 21 August 2014 15:26

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To help environment, try meat with, gulp, tofu

CONSERVATION-FLASH IN THE PAN

By ARI LEVAUX

Since Meatless Monday first became a thing, in 2003, it’s become a popular New Year’s resolution to skip meat for one day a week. The amount of food - and the land required to grow it - that’s used to produce meat could feed vegetables to a lot more people, with less greenhouse gas production and other environmental fallout.

As this idea has become ingrained in the mainstream understanding of where meat comes from, many have concluded, sadly, that they should cut back on meat.

I’m fortunate to be able to shoot enough deer each year that I can avoid many of the ethical issues related to industrial meat production (hunting has its own set of issues). I eat a ton of wild game without compunction, but I sympathize with the purchasers of feedlot meat who want to reduce their consumption.

While some meat eaters aren’t ready to make this step, others are ready to take it a notch past a mere Meatless Monday. Both groups could do well to consider the ancient Chinese secret of mixing their meat with tofu, which effectively cuts meat consumption in half for a given meal.

For some, Meatless Monday could flow into Bacon Tofu Tuesday, while those taking baby steps could try half-meat Monday.

Meat lovers often look down on tofu as a bland substitute for their protein of choice. Indeed, protein content notwithstanding, they are nothing alike. You can’t just swap tofu for meat and expect no one to notice.

That much was clear to me when, as a young vegetarian, my dad tried to make me eat bean curd, as he called it, so I wouldn’t become malnourished. Bean curd’s culinary virtues, as he explained them, were based on its ability to absorb the flavors around it. While by itself tofu may taste like a more succulent version of chalk, if you cook it with yummy ingredients it will taste similarly yummy.

Alas, when those accompanying ingredients are plant-based, as is the case with vegetarian tofu dishes, it’s a laughable meat substitute. But when the accompanying ingredients are pork-based, another side of tofu emerges. While Swiss chard-flavored tofu might not satisfy a carnivorous hunger, bacon-greased bean curd is a proven winner.

My local Chinese restaurant does spectacular things with pork and tofu. The Jackie Chan special, for example, combines slices of pork belly with dried tofu and mustard greens, while the “Chinese-style” twice-cooked pork is half tofu - and nobody complains. The kitchen also cranks out a great version of the Szechuan comfort food mapo tofu, in which ground pork and chunks of tofu are cooked together with tongue-numbing Szechuan pink peppercorns (not related to black pepper), in a black bean chili sauce. In China, Mapo Tofu is so popular there are restaurants that serve nothing else.

Tofu and pork are cooked together in the cuisines of other Asian countries as well, including Korea and Japan, each of which has its own version of mapo tofu, as well as Southeast Asian countries like Vietnam.

In the U.S., where tofu is still largely considered a meat substitute, rather than having an identity of its own, the combination of pork and tofu is often considered an oxymoron.

But I love everything about this counterintuitive pairing, from the flavor to the sentiment behind it. Nothing screams “tofu is not a meat substitute!” more than mixing it with bacon.

While a poor meat substitute, it’s a great meat extender. Adding a brick’s worth of tofu slices allows you to use meat than you would have, without feeling deprived.

One of the easiest ways to experience porky tofu is to fry it with bacon, in oyster sauce. Firm tofu is best for this. Start by frying the tofu, in a little oil, and when it’s nearly done to your liking add the bacon, chopped in inch-squares. Stir gently so as not to break the tofu chunks. When the bacon is nearly done, add minced garlic. Stir it around for a second, then add a few tablespoons of oyster sauce, along with some white wine or water if the pan is dry. Serve with rice. Vegetables can be added to this dish as well, at different points, depending on how long they take to cook. I like to keep it simple with just one vegetable, like broccoli, or kale.

I’m not often mistaken for a Chinese chef, but the results were impressive when I followed Marc Matsumoto’s Mapo Tofu recipe that I found on the PBS Fresh Bites blog (www.pbs.org/food/fresh-tastes/mapo-tofu). Matsumoto also discusses the meaning of the dish’s name, which translates into something like Pockmark-Faced Lady’s Tofu. Not the most appetizing name, but boy does it hit the spot. My pork-averse wife ate more than I did.

If you can get your hands on sprouted tofu, you should give it a try. Even raw, it tastes considerably better than succulent chalk, and has more nutrients than unsprouted tofu.

Sprouted tofu is typically sold in firm bricks, rather than the soft variety that’s best for Mapo Tofu. But with bacon and oyster sauce, firm sprouted tofu works great. And there is something deeply satisfying, on a semantic level, about eating sprouted tofu with bacon. It’s like eating something that doesn’t make any sense and shouldn’t exist, like braised perpetual motion. This, and the amazing flavor of pork and tofu, can make cutting back on meat feel more like a gift than a sacrifice.

Last Updated on Thursday, 21 August 2014 15:24

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Australian bluesman Harper has new album

MAGIC CITY BLUES

By ALAN SCULLEY - Last Word Features

Australian blues musician Harper’s newest album isn’t a Harper album in the strict sense.

Called “Bare Bones,” it’s a collaborative album with fellow Detroit-based bluesman Motor City Josh. What also makes the album unusual is it finds the two artists stepping away from their accustomed plugged in, full band sound on an album that features just Peter Harper’s harmonica playing, Josh Ford’s acoustic guitar and vocals from each artist.

Harper likes the way the album came out.

“It’s been a lot of fun,” Harper said of the project during a recent phone interview. “I grew up listening to blues, and I guess over time I’ve changed slightly in my style of writing. But it’s always there, that bluesy kind of feel. So it was nice to get right back to the beginning again.”

For Harper, blues came into his life not long after, at age 11, he moved with his parents from their native of England, to Perth, Australia. In that Western city down under, the budding musician discovered a thriving scene for blues, folk and other forms of roots music.

Harper (who uses only his last name professionally) was still in his mid-teens when he first started playing music professionally. From the start, he focused on writing original music, and he found a receptive audience down under, releasing six albums before his 2005 album, “Down to the Rhythm,” became his first album to be released in the United States.

By that time, Harper had established his presence in the states, He first came over to tour in 1996 and returned multiple times in the years that followed. After landing his first U.S. deal with Blind Pig Records he moved to Ann Arbor, Mich.

Along the way, Harper’s songwriting expanded well beyond its original blues direction. His three albums on Blind Pig – “Down to the Rhythm,” “Day by Day” (2007) and “Stand Together” (2010) – had songs that touched on edgy rock, classic soul, funk and rhythm and blues and even Southern-tinged acoustic rock.

The diversity was a product of Harper’s desire to find his own sound and branch beyond the structures and styles common in blues and other forms of roots music.

But an unforeseen chance to collaborate with Ford at a fundraiser for a food bank in Flint, Mich., in December 2012 sent Harper back for an initial encounter with his early blues roots.

“They (organizers of the fund-raiser) were expecting us to bring our whole bands, but we couldn’t get that together,” Harper said.

So Ford suggested the two team up for an acoustic set instead – an idea Harper immediately seconded.

“We did that and we really liked each other’s playing,” Harper said. “It was funny, after that we went ‘Well, we should do something together.’”

The stripped back guitar-harmonic-vocal approach to the album works wonderfully because Harper and Ford wrote songs with strong melodies, solid playing (Harper’s harmonica is especially impressive) and lyrics that have something to say – whether it’s a good humored tune like “Pot Hole BBQ” (about the quality of Detroit’s potholes) or more serious commentary as in “Hydrogenated Food” or “Just Too Big to Fail.”

Harper and Ford did some touring earlier this year, but Harper is now out doing a headlining show.

Ostensibly, Harper and his band are touring behind his most recent album, a 2012 concert disc, “Live at The Blues Hall of Fame.”

“I’ve always wanted to do a live one. People were always asking for a live CD,” Harper said. “Unfortunately, at the time I was signed to Blind Pig Records, and they didn’t want to do one. They wanted to keep the studio ones going. So when I finished my deal with them – and I love them, by the way; we were not parting as enemies. I really respect Blind Pig. I think they’ve been awesome for me. So as soon as I finished my contract with them, I just went out, and it timed perfectly because we had the hall of fame thing. I thought that’s a great place to be able to record something really special. And that was a great way to have a live CD, just the fact that it was a special time in my career. So it worked out perfect.”

As the title of the live album suggests, Harper recently was inducted into the Canadian Blues Hall of Fame. He enjoys a strong following in Canada, and Florida has also become a touring stronghold for Harper. He said he makes sure that he has something new to offer in his live show - even if he has played a certain city recently.

“I like to change my shows,” Harper said. “I don’t want to be one of those bands that you see, and then 10 years later, you’re still saying and playing the same things. So I always like to keep it fresh. And I think it’s good for the players, too. You can get too comfortable with stuff, and then it looks like you’re just going through the motions. So it’s always good to change things up. And at the moment, I’m trying to write a new CD. So there will be new songs as well coming in. I  usually road test them and see how the audience reacts before I’ll stick them on an album. So it’s nice to do that as well.”

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 August 2014 11:48

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Trombone Shorty reunites Meters

MAGIC CITY BLUES

By ALAN SCULLEY - Last Word Features

There’s no telling how Trombone Shorty’s latest album, “Say That to Say This,” will be remembered in the future. The CD was only released in September, and how “Say That to Say This” will impact the course of Trombone Shorty’s music and career – or music in general - won’t be known for some time.

The album still might become a commercial breakthrough for the New Orleans-based trombonist/trumpet player. Perhaps it will be hailed as an artistic high point in his young career. Or, maybe “Say That to Say This” won’t have any such dramatic impact and it will go down as just one of many albums that make up Trombone Shorty’s catalog.

But before those or any other outcomes begin to take shape, “Say That to Say This” – his ninth studio album – has already done something few albums achieve – it’s made history.

That’s because this is the album that brought together the original members of the seminal New Orleans band, the Meters, to record together for the first time in more than three decades. They back Trombone Shorty on “Be My Lady,” a song the Meters first recorded on that group’s 1977 album “New Directions.”

The significance of the occasion is not lost on Trombone Shorty (whose real name is Troy Andrews).

“They know how much they mean to New Orleans music, and I know how much they mean,” Andrews said in a recent phone interview. “I don’t know what the contemporary sound of New Orleans music would sound like if the Meters didn’t do what they did.”

The influence of the Meters, indeed, can’t be overstated. During their initial run together from 1965-1977, Art Neville, George Porter Jr., Leo Nocentelli and Zigaboo Modeliste (with Cyril Neville added to the lineup a bit later) forged a trailblazing sound that blended funk and the traditional second-line rhythms of New Orleans with rock, jazz and soul.

While Art Neville and Porter have continued to perform as the Funky Meters over the years and the original members have done an occasional live show, they hadn’t been in a studio together until Andrews did the improbable and coaxed them into recording “Be My Lady.”

The idea of the reunion happened casually enough. Andrews had been working on “Say That to Say This” and one day was riding around New Orleans with his cousin while they listened to some classic music made in that city.

“We were listening to all that old music from New Orleans, the Meters, Dr. John, Allen Toussaint, Ernie K. Doe, and for some reason we were really excited about that, as if it came out while we were living,” said Andrews, who was born in 1986.

“So the Meters thing came on and I was like ‘Man, they’ve got everything that represents my band, vocals, horn parts, funky grooves, and I was like ‘Let’s re-do that song,’” Andrews said. “‘I’m going to get the Meters to play with us.’”

His cousin laughed off the idea, but Andrews was serious. And he had one thing in his favor. He personally knew the members of the Meters and considers them to be like his uncles.

The elder musicians had watched Andrews as he grew up, starting out as a precocious child prodigy – he started playing trombone at age 6 – going on to attend the prestigious New Orleans Center for Creative Arts before embarking on a recording career that has now seen Andrews release a half-dozen acclaimed albums that have established him as arguably the brightest young talent on the city’s music scene.

So Andrews phoned each member of the Meters and presented his plan.

“I told each one of them that, and there was a silence on the phone when I said that,” Andrews said.

“I reached out (first) to George Porter and I said ‘Man, I want to do ‘Be My Lady’ from y’all’s record, ‘New Directions,’ but I want to get the original cast.’ Like I tell you, no joke, no lie, I told each one of them that, and there was a silence on the phone when I said that,” Andrews said.

But he could tell that, if reluctant, they were also intrigued by the idea. One by one, they signed on.

“Be My Lady” is one of many high points on “Say That to Say This.” Its silky funk sound provides a relaxed change of pace on an album that finds Andrews continuing to develop his distinctive hybrid of New Orleans funk, jazz, soul and gritty rock ’n’ roll. This collision of styles is especially effective on songs like “You and I (Outta This Place),” “Fire and Brimstone” and the title track, where guitar riffs, punchy, sharp syncopated rhythms and jazzy horn lines make for a modern, enervating and original type of New Orleans music.

The rocking character of the music is what sets Andrews apart from other New Orleans artists. He credits a touring stint shortly after graduating from high school with Lenny Kravitz with helping him figure out how to bring rock music and his New Orleans roots together in his sound.

“That situation changed my whole mentality, changed my life,” Andrews said. “Once I did that, I was able to come back to New Orleans and add what I learned from him to my New Orleans (sound). Now you had the sound that you hear now.”

Trombone Shorty and New Orleans Avenue are busy bringing their energetic music to the people on a summer tour and introducing audiences to songs from “Say That to Say This.”

“We’ve been doing some music from our previous records and then we’ve been trying to slide in four or five songs from the new record here and there,” Andrews said.

“We’re just trying to figure out what’s a good way to slide them in. We’ve been doing it mostly toward the end of the set, after we get everything out of the way. Then we hit them full swing slipping in the new material there. So it’s been really cool.”

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 August 2014 11:44

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Train headlines concerts on Saturday at fair

MONTANAFAIR

By ALAN SCULLEY - Last Word Features

As Train hits the concert trail this summer and prepares to release its latest album, “Bulletproof Picasso,” in September, the group is down to two original members.

Drummer Scott Underwood quit Train in June, leaving singer Pat Monahan and guitarist Jimmy Stafford as the remaining members in a revamped lineup that now also includes guitarist Jerry Becker, bassist Hector Maldonado (they both became touring members in 2009) and new drummer Drew Shoals.

But don’t get the idea that, even though Monahan and Stafford are officially the only full-fledged band members, that Train has become a group in name only, according to Stafford.

“We don’t want to appear like Tears for Fears (which essentially was Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith). We’re not Tears For Fears,” Stafford said in a mid-July phone interview. “We want to feel and look like a band, so we include those guys in everything. They’re in the new band photos. We treat them like equals. We ask their opinions. We ride on the same buses with them. It’s not like Pat and I are flying around in private jets and those guys are in a van.”

In fact, Stafford says the current lineup is especially cohesive and tight knit.

“We’re having a good time on stage and I think the crowds can see that, and I think it comes across in our music as well,” he said. “But you know, there have been pluses to every formation of the band throughout the years. The original five guys, we had a thing. We had a, you know, we just kind of had a vibe and a thing that attracted people to us in the beginning. But we had to move on from a couple of those original members. Then we had a couple of new people in, Johnny Colt and Brandon Bush, for awhile, and that was cool time, too, and we wrote some cool songs together. We had a really good time during that period as well.

“I think we’re just in a really good place right now,” Stafford said. “We’ve got awesome musicians, just everything feels really good and really solid and really positive right now for the band.”

Obviously, long-running bands usually go through changes, and Train, which celebrates its 20th year as a group this year, is no exception.

The original lineup – Monahan, Stafford, guitarist Rob Hotchkiss, bassist Charlie Colin and Underwood – made three albums together – scoring hit singles with “Meet Virginia,” “Drops Of Jupiter” and “Calling All Angels,” among others. Colt and Bush replaced Hotchkiss and Colin for the fourth album, 2006’s “For Me, It’s You,” before they departed and Monahan, Stafford and Underwood decided to move on as a trio for the 2009 album, “Save Me, San Francisco.”

But the change that may have had the biggest impact at that point was the decision that Monahan would work with outside songwriters instead of keeping songwriting within the band – a move Stafford endorsed.

The shift in the songwriting approach worked like gangbusters for the newly slimmed down edition of Train. “Save Me, San Francisco,” produced a blockbuster hit single in “Save Me, San Francisco,” and Train was again a force on pop and Top 40 radio.

For the 2012 album, “California 37,” Monahan worked with many of the same outside writers – most notably Espen Lind and Amund Bjorklund (known collectively as Espionage). Once again Train hit paydirt with the multi-format hit single “Drive By.”

Now comes “Bulletproof Picasso,” which like “California 37,” was produced by Butch Walker. Its first single, “Angel in Blue Jeans,” is another collaboration between Monahan, Lind and Bjorkland (who also co-wrote “Hey, Soul Sister” and “Drive By”).

“Bulletproof Picasso,” Stafford said, fits the mold of other Train albums, while offering a few shades of difference.

“It’s pretty diverse, and there are some acoustic type ballads and then there are rock tunes. There’s almost like a little Western flavor that runs through the album,” Stafford said. “I think production wise, it was produced really well by Butch Walker. And I think these are Pat’s best lyrics, in my opinion. It seems like more mature lyrics. You know, he’s had a thing, it’s almost Pat’s style in the past to throw some quirky lyrics in here and there in some songs. This record is a little bit less of that. It’s just a really strong lyrical album, great melodies.”

Fans, though, won’t hear much of “Bulletproof Picasso” at Train concerts this summer. That’s a bit frustrating to Stafford, but he understands the situation.

“We can’t play too much of the new music because people won’t be familiar with it,” he said. “And we’re dying to play the new songs. We can play the new single (Angel in Blue Jeans”), and the past few nights we’ve started slipping in one or two new songs during every show. But people just, they’re not familiar with it, so it’s tough until the album comes out in September.”

Last Updated on Friday, 08 August 2014 11:45

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Barbecue competition draws top cooking teams

MONTANAFAIR

If you are a master of meat; the purveyor of the pits; or the king or queen of kabobs, the 2014 MontanaFair is looking for you.

Enter the Montana State BBQ Championship on Aug. 12-13 at MontanaFair. Go to www.MontanaFair.com for entry information or to become a certified judge.

The event is one of the most anticipated and yummiest events every year. Professional and amateur barbecue competition teams from across Montana and the nation compete for glory and a share of more than $10,000 in prize money.

This year’s contest is part of the Rocky Mountain BBQ Association Cup Challenge, providing for more teams, more prize money, and more good barbecue. Teams will compete in four meat categories: Chicken, pork, pork ribs and beef brisket. 

Entry deadline is August 8.

Following the judging on Wednesday, Aug. 13, barbecue competitors may choose to offer samples for sale from 2-5 p.m. that evening. “MontanaFair Bones Bucks” will be available for sale and tasting samples will be sold for one “Buck” per taste.

There’s even a Kid’s Q competition for children 6-16 with nearly $500 in prize money available. Rules state that an adult must accompany the children, but the children have to do all the preparation, seasoning and cooking on their own. Judges will award prizes and premiums in the contest for first to 10th place using Kansas City Barbeque Society scoring (blind judging).

The Montana State BBQ Championship is sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbeque Society. KCBS is the largest organization of barbecue and grilling enthusiasts in the world with more than 14,000 professional members. Certified KCBS judges are used in the competition and the judging certification class is Aug. 11 at MontanaFair.

Last Updated on Friday, 08 August 2014 11:46

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