The Billings Outpost

Danger in medicine cabinets

SENIORS

A potentially deadly danger lurks in the medicine cabinets of local seniors this summer. Did you know that heat, when combined with certain medications, can seriously harm seniors?

SYNERGY HomeCare, a non-medical in-home care franchise, recommends that families pay special attention to seniors who are taking any medications this summer.

Considering that some 80 percent to 86 percent of seniors suffer from a chronic condition or disease that requires medication, the summer heat can pose significant challenges.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

• Seniors are more prone to heat stroke and heat-related stress because their bodies can’t adjust to sudden changes in temperature.

• Seniors who take certain prescription medications are more susceptible to heat-related injuries and illnesses.

“During the hot summer months, families really need to pay special attention to their elderly loved ones who are taking medications and may not understand the health risks,” says Rick Basch, president of SYNERGY HomeCare. “We strongly urge families to consult with their doctor or pharmacist regarding the potential impact of heat on any medications.   If family members aren’t available, our Caregivers can be an excellent resource for monitoring any potentially adverse reactions to heat that a senior may experience.”

Prescription for trouble

• Antidepressants and antihistamines act on an area of the brain that controls the skin’s ability to make sweat. Sweating is the body’s natural cooling system. People who can’t sweat are at risk for overheating.

• Beta blockers reduce the ability of the heart and lungs to adapt to stresses, including hot weather. This also increases a person’s risk of heat stroke and other heat related illnesses.

• Amphetamines can raise body temperature.

• Diuretics act on kidneys and encourage fluid loss. This can quickly lead to dehydration in hot weather.

• Sedatives can reduce a person’s awareness of physical discomfort which means symptoms of heat stress may be ignored.

• Ephedrine/Pseudoephedrine found in over-the-counter decongestants decrease blood flow to the skin and impact the body’s ability to cool down.

“We want to do everything we can to ensure that our seniors don’t make the headlines this summer due to heat-related conditions,” says Basch. “Our Caregivers can be a lifesaver (literally), when it comes to keeping seniors well hydrated, cool and comfortable. They’re an extra set of eyes and when it really counts.”

Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 11:32

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2 facilities awarded Bronze

SENIORS

Billings Health & Rehabilitation Community and Westpark Village, A Senior Living Community have been recognized as 2014 recipients of the Bronze -Commitment to Quality National Quality Award for their outstanding performance in the health care profession.

The award, presented by the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living, highlights facilities across the nation that have demonstrated their intention to pursue a rigorous quality improvement system.

“I applaud Billings Health & Rehabilitation Community and Westpark Village for their commitment to delivering quality care,” said Mark Parkinson, president and chief executive officer of AHCA/NCAL. “This award represents the dedication that each Bronze recipient has given to improve quality in the long term and post-acute care profession.”

Implemented by AHCA/NCAL in 1996, the National Quality Award Program is centered on the core values and criteria of the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program.

The program assists providers of long term and post-acute care services in achieving their performance excellence goals.

Billings Health & Rehabilitation Community and Westpark Village were two of only seven Montana facilities to receive the Bronze level award.

The Goodman Group managed communities, The Village Health Care Center and The Village Senior Residence in Missoula, Mont., were also awarded the bronze-level award. The recipient centers will be honored during the AHCA/NCAL’s 65th annual Convention and Exposition, Oct. 5-8, 2014, in Washington, D.C.

Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 11:29

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Jordan country offers prairie magnificence

 Photo by Rick and Susie Graetz The river breaks and badlands north of Jordan.
 
By RICK AND SUSIE GRAETZ - University of Montana - Department of Geography

Late 1800s photographer L. A. Huffman called it “The Big Open,” National Geographic termed it “Jordan Country” and others dubbed the sparsely populated landscape south of Fort Peck Lake “The Big Dry.” The heart of this scenic territory is the small town of Jordan.

Rising from the banks of Big Dry Creek and straddling Montana Highway 200, Jordan was founded in about 1896 by Arthur Jordan. He asked that the town take the name of a friend from Miles City who also was named Jordan. The first residence was Arthur’s tent. Later, he established a post office and store for this fledgling cow town.

The town and surrounding expanse of rangeland still are very much cowboy country, and the place retains an Old West flavor. False front buildings on Main Street – some more than 80 years old – haven’t changed much since the community’s early days.

This seat of Garfield County offers entry into some of the West’s most remote and beautiful mix of deep river canyons, badlands and prairie wilderness. The most rugged terrain is part of Charles M. Russell Wildlife Refuge. Out here, antelope, elk, mule deer, whitetail deer, wild turkeys, sage grouse and numerous waterfowl make these lands their home.

Many roads and trails deliver you into and through this wild country. Before striking out, inquire at the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge in Jordan. They can advise you on conditions and the best routes to follow. It’s very important to get good information to make the most of your time. This is big territory you’ll be wandering into, and a place that will amaze you. It truly is an uncommon landscape and one of the most fantastic wilderness regions of America.

Hell Creek State Park, located on Fort Peck Lake 26 miles north of Jordan, is a popular recreation area. On the way you’ll go through the scenic Piney Buttes and over high rises that offer excellent views of some of the upper reaches of the Missouri Breaks and the CMR Refuge. Outside of Jordan, Devil’s Creek, Snow Creek and Crooked Creek also are worthwhile places to visit. And the Haxby Road, about six miles east of town, reaches a long way through the badlands into the Breaks and the western edge of an area called the Big Dry Arm of Fort Peck Lake. These routes reveal scenic wonders that are among the most magnificent prairie geography in the nation.

The stretch of Missouri River Country from the Fred Robinson Bridge to Fort Peck is a showcase of sandstone creatures and badlands that illustrate evidence of what passed here many millions of years ago. Sections of Garfield (Jordan) and McCone (Circle) counties were home to Tyrannosaurus Rex, Triceratops, Albertosaurus, Mosasaurus (a marine reptile) and other giant creatures. Because of erosion, some of the richest records of prehistoric life in the world have been and continue to be uncovered here. In 1902, one of the first intact T-Rex fossils ever found was discovered near Jordan in the Hell Creek badlands. The Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge is home to much of this dinosaur burial ground.

Some 65 million years ago, when not totally underwater (much of Montana east of the mountains was covered by a shallow inland sea), this area was part of a hot, humid sub-tropical coastline of marshes, rivers and river deltas bearing dense vegetation near the watercourses and grassy plains farther to the west. It was the time of the dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures – the climate and habitat were just right.

Exploring farther from Jordan, head east on Montana Highway 200 towards the town of Circle. Twenty-five miles out, you’ll enter a 10mile stretch of spectacular views with red-and-yellow-colored buttes, badlands and distant vistas. Thirty-six miles from town you’ll encounter Highway 24 pointing north. It parallels the Dry Arm section and eastern edge of Fort Peck Lake. If you’d like to camp, put a boat in the water or just see the lake, take advantage of the recreation areas along the its length. There are several and they are well-marked.

Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 11:22

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Another promising writer sets her novel in Billings

*BOOKS*

“The Pinioned Birds,” by Janet Trask Cox. Self-published. Paperback, 302 pages. $12.99

By STEPHEN DOW - The Billings Outpost

Janet Trask Cox’s self-published debut novel “The Pinioned Birds” is a beautiful depiction of life in Montana during the early 20th century. However, a few technical issues keep it from soaring to lofty heights - just like the titular birds.

Even though “The Pinioned Birds” is fiction, it is based on the life of Cox’s parents. The story takes place from 1929-1940 and tells the story of the Matthews family, who own a sheep ranch near Ballantine. Oldest son Will Matthews returns to his childhood home with his new fiancée in the hopes that he will return to work with the Matthews Sheep Co. after serving in World War I.

But when he returns, he finds that his family’s attitude toward him has changed dramatically. He also discovers that his father and younger brother Dixon are taking part in some potentially illegal activities in order to expand the boundaries of the ranch.

There was a lot to like about “The Pinioned Birds,” but perhaps its strongest asset was the engaging setting. As a longtime Billings resident, I was intrigued to learn what Billings and Ballantine were like in the early 20th century. Billings landmarks such as the Northern Hotel and the Babcock Theater were featured prominently and lent a sense of authenticity to the story.

As a history buff, I also appreciated how Cox wove significant historical events such as the two world wars, Prohibition, and the Great Depression into the story. Seeing how these events affected the everyday life of the Matthews family and their ranch added another interesting layer to the rich and surprisingly complex story.

Another aspect of the story that worked well was Will’s complex relationship with his father and brother. This part of the story could have easily fallen into melodrama, but the interactions felt realistic and believable.

This was due in no small part to the engaging characters that Cox created. Will was a particularly engaging protagonist as he attempted to balance his views of right and wrong with his family’s expectations.

Other characters are similarly three-dimensional. For example, Will’s ambitious brother Dixon could have easily become a stereotypical greedy villain, but Cox never lost sight of his humanity. Similarly, Will’s father R.T. was both a hero and villain during certain parts of the story and ultimately emerged as a tragic figure that the audience could sympathize with.

Another strong aspect of Cox’s tale was the relationship between the Matthews family and the Native Americans who lived on the nearby Crow reservation. What started out as a friendship between the two groups eventually turned into a predatory relationship where the Matthews clan did whatever it took to obtain the Native Americans’ land. This subplot provided a poignant reminder of what can happen when we let greed overcome the better aspects of our human nature.

Overall, “The Pinioned Birds” was an engaging novel, but occasional technical issues kept pulling me out of the story. You wouldn’t expect these issues to pop up in a story written by an author who has a master of fine arts degree in creative writing, but they appeared nonetheless.

For example, Cox seemed to be especially fond of convoluted sentences. Here is the worst offender – a sentence that takes up more than 14 lines on page 46 of the book:

“So, when Clara Matthews told R.T. when he came down the staircase smelling of shaving soap in anticipation of Mrs. Lochwood’s Sunday gossip from town, and then Dixon when he came through the swinging door from the kitchen for breakfast with his father and then Jeanette later when she came from the blue house with the proper placement of the salad fork and the dessert fork in relation to the dinner fork predominant on her mind and then the Lochwoods when they drove down after church in Billings (taking the perfunctory highway route rather than loping dumb struck cross-country) and lastly the Treets fresh from the wooden steps of the Ballantine Congregational Church who came out as a matter of habit after shaking dozens of callused hands, each knew what Clara Matthews knew, but what none had been told.”

There were also occasional grammatical errors throughout the book such as this one on page 150 where Cox completely omits a word: “Will did not to stop at the big house.”

It’s a shame that these errors exist because “The Pinioned Birds” was a very good book that could have been a great book with a little tweaking. As it is, the novel provides a likably nostalgic look at the Montana of the past while dealing with issues of greed, racism and family relationships that are just as relevant now as they were in 1929.

I hope that Trask allows us back into the lives of the Matthews family in the near future – though next time, she might want to take an editor along.

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 July 2014 10:48

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‘The Home Place’ has great writing, flaws

*BOOKS*

By STEPHEN DOW - The Billings Outpost

Billings lawyer Carrie La Seur’s debut novel “The Home Place,” coming out this month, is an engaging and thoughtful novel that dares readers to ask: “What is home? And why is it so important?”

The novel tells the story of Alma Terrebonne, a Montana native who is a lawyer in Seattle. When she finds out that her sister Vicky has died, Alma must confront her own past failures as she returns home and tries to find out the truth about her sibling’s death.

La Seur’s story tries to be many things at once, and it succeeds at some more than others. In just over 300 pages, it contains elements of a murder mystery, family drama and romance. It also attempts to address deeper political issues affecting Montana citizens today.

The mystery driving this story is a compelling one: Was Alma’s sister Vicky murdered or did she simply die from overexposure to Billings’ awful winter weather? And, if it’s the former, then who committed the crime? The mystery keeps the audience guessing until the shocking ending.

The quieter family moments are also quite involving due to the well-developed characters that La Seur fills her pages with. Alma is a particularly relatable character as she tries to rectify her past mistakes and struggles to make the right decisions for her orphaned niece Brittany.

The supporting characters are equally memorable. My personal favorites include Alma’s tender and loving grandmother Maddie, Detective Curtis (the Crow man investigating Vicky’s death), and Alma’s Aunt Helen.

La Seur surrounds these characters with some well developed settings. It’s clear that she knows the town of Billings well as she references many local landmarks (including Montana State University Billings and Billings Clinic) throughout the story. However, as La Seur mentions on her website, she’s not going to be writing tourism brochures for the city anytime soon: Her portrayal of Billings focuses on the city’s dark side while ignoring many of its more positive aspects.

Perhaps that’s because the author’s heart is drawn towards Montana’s rural areas. It is obvious that La Seur has a love for this unchanged land and the people who still live on it as if they were from an earlier era. This affection makes the sections of the book set at Alma’s “Home Place” particularly engaging and memorable.

The Oxford-educated La Seur knows how to write some beautiful sentences as well. Take for example, this memorable opening paragraph:

“The cold on a January night in Billings, Montana, is personal and spiritual. It knows your weaknesses. It communicates with your fears. If you have a god, this cold pulls a veil between you and your deity … . It sounds like wolves and reverberates like drums in all the hollow places where you wonder who you are and what you would do in extremis. In this cold, you understand at last that you are not brave at all.”

Perhaps my favorite line comes early on when Alma is talking to Detective Curtis:

“Detective Cutis’s voice is soft, contrite, and marked with the softshoe rhythms of a native Crow speaker. Ka-hay. Sho’o Daa Chi, Alma thinks, the greeting all she remembers of the language that floats unseen through the city like water in the irrigation ditches, dust underfoot, ever present, barely acknowledged.”

Though “The Home Place” works as a whole, there are still some problematic issues that make it a bit less enjoyable.

While the first and last few chapters are engaging and intriguing, the book does lag quite a bit in the middle – especially as La Seur takes a break from both the mystery and the family drama to focus on a romance between Alma and her high school crush Chance Murphy. I am not normally opposed to romances, but this one is so predictable and takes up such a large chunk of the book that it distracts from some of the more thoughtful and creative ideas that La Seur introduces.

La Seur’s political commentary is similarly unsuccessful. Her attempt to address the impact of industrialization on rural lands is too broad. The main coal company employee in the book is a forgettable one-dimensional villain who’s willing to do whatever it takes to get land rights. In reality, this issue is much deeper and complex than the simple conclusion that La Seur reaches: Coal companies are evil and home owners are good.

While the treatment of coal companies in this book is heavy-handed, the other political issue that La Seur addresses is dealt with so briefly that most readers will completely miss it. Through the character of Detective Curtis, La Seur attempts to address the bigotry shown toward Native Americans in Montana. It’s a subject worth addressing, but La Seur only brings it up in two short and fairly forgettable conversations. In fact, I didn’t even realize that La Seur was trying to address this issue until I looked at her website a few days after finishing the book.

Though “The Home Place” has some problems, it is certainly worth reading. At the very least, it serves as a likable introduction to a talented new writer. Hopefully, we won’t have to wait another decade for her next book.

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 July 2014 10:45

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Chinese pollution may threaten American food

FLASH IN THE PAN - *MEDICAL*

By ARI LEVAUX

Heavy metal pollution makes no distinction between how crops are grown. Supposedly clean agricultural practices like organic will offer no protection, if the likes of cadmium, arsenic, lead, nickel and mercury are in the soil or water.

Human practices like mining and manufacturing are by far the largest source of potential contamination. Such activities release heavy metals into the air and water, from where they find their ways into the soil and plants, from where they are extremely difficult to remove.

Last April the Chinese government acknowledged that a staggering one-fifth of its arable land is seriously polluted with heavy metals, thanks to decades of aggressive industrial development. China’s Environmental Protection Ministry, looking at samples taken between 2006 and 2013, described the situation as “not optimistic.”

The revelation came after months of speculation about the report, which at one point was not going to be released as the results were considered to be a “state secret.”

Heavy metals can accumulate in the body, causing chronic problems in the skin, intestine, nervous system, kidneys, liver, and brain. Some can occur naturally in soil, though rarely at toxic levels (although some plants, like rice, are really good at accumulating some metals, like arsenic).

The most commonly found heavy metals were cadmium, nickel and arsenic. Cadmium, one of the most toxic of heavy metals, moves through soil layers with ease, and is taken up by a variety of plants, including leafy vegetables, root crops, cereals and grains. Last year it was discovered that nearly half of the rice for sale in the southern China city of Guangzhou was tainted with cadmium.

Nickel and arsenic, the other two pollutants found in greatest amounts, aren’t so great either.

In the U.S., arsenic in apple juice has been on the radar since September of 2011, when Dr. Mehmet Oz reported high arsenic levels in multiple samples of apple juice that were independently tested for his television show. More than half of the apple juice consumed in the U.S. comes from China.

Oz was taken to the woodshed by a number of experts and authorities, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which disputed the results with its own data. ABC News’ senior health medical editor Dr. Richard Besser called Oz’s claims “extremely irresponsible,” and compared it to yelling “Fire!” in a crowded theater.

A few weeks later FDA admitted that it had withheld many test results which did, in fact, support Oz’s claim. Besser apologized to Oz on national television, and soon after the FDA collected about 90 retail samples of apple juice for a new round of analysis. According to FDA documents now available, the levels reported by Oz are in fact consistent with those detected by the agency in samples from China and Turkey.

Last year the FDA set a limit, also known as an “action level,” on arsenic in juice, at 10 parts per billion, the same level that’s enforced in drinking water. Currently, FDA has import alerts set for four companies that deal in apple concentrates, two each in China and Turkey. The products of these companies are regularly tested for arsenic because of previous violations of this action level, but they continue to be imported.

While China isn’t the only polluted place from which we import food, with a combination of aggressive industrial development and legendarily lax enforcement, it’s become a poster child for scary food imports. But any region with rapid industrial development and suspect environmental regulations could be a candidate for producing food contaminated with heavy metals (and other toxins, for that matter).

While we don’t import a huge amount of food from China overall, we do consume large amounts of certain things in addition to apple juice, like garlic and farmed seafood - including 80 percent of the tilapia we eat. Much of China’s surface water, including water where aquaculture occurs, is polluted, not only with industrial toxins but also agricultural fertilizers, which fuels the growth of algae. Algae can accumulate heavy metals, as will the fish that eat it.

“Foods offered for import into the U.S. are required to meet the same U.S. food safety standards as domestic products,” explained FDA Press Officer Lauren Sucher, via email. “If the FDA encounters information that indicates that a particular product could pose a public health concern, the FDA can target that product for increased testing.”

When asked if the revelation that 20 percent of China’s farmland is polluted with heavy metals will inspire increased testing on Chinese imports, Sucher replied, “The FDA doesn’t announce its actions in advance. If our surveillance sampling indicated a problem with a particular commodity, the agency would take steps to protect the public.”

Wary consumers who aren’t interested in waiting for FDA to possibly ramp up its testing of Chinese food imports can take their own measures to minimize the possibility of contamination. Local, as in American-grown produce, will trump labels such as “organic,” if the food in question was grown in a potentially polluted place.

In fact, if the food is grown in a polluted place, organic produce could contain more heavy metals than conventionally grown food. Organic agriculture practices include the use of manure, which could add heavy metals to the soil if the cattle were eating contaminated feed, such as hay grown in a contaminated field, according to Dr. Michael Schmitt, a soil scientist at the University of Minnesota.

“Once you put metals in a field,” he told me by phone, “they don’t go away.”

The notion that organic food from a polluted place like China could carry more heavy metals than nonorganic food from the U.S. puts a new spin on the idea of eating locally.

In this case, eating locally could mean consuming food grown anywhere in this vast continent. But in a way, the reasons are similar to why many people prefer buying from the local farm stand: You have more information about how something is grown. But using this information requires knowing something about where you live. Such as, is there any heavy metal contamination around here?

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 July 2014 10:31

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Montana teens text and drive

*MEDICAL*

By DEBORAH COURSON SMITH - Big Sky Connection

HELENA – Teens in Montana and throughout the nation were quizzed about their behavior and lifestyle choices for the latest Youth Risk Behavior survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The survey showed teen smoking has dropped below the target level of 16 percent. But that victory is tempered by the number of young people nationally, 41 percent, who admit to texting or e-mailing while driving. In Montana, that rate is about 56 percent.

Stephanie Zaza, director of the division of adolescent and school health at the CDC, urged parents to step in to stop any behavior that takes a teen’s attention away from the road.

“Parents play an active role in keeping their teen drivers safe,” said Zaza, “by close monitoring, frequent discussions, parent-teen driving agreements and acting as a role model of good driving habits.”

Tom Frieden, CDC Director, said the smoking reduction numbers are a fragile victory, because of the rise in popularity of e-cigarettes, smoking pens and electronic hookahs, as well as a lack of regulations for those products.

“We’re particularly concerned with e-cigarettes re-glamorizing smoking traditional cigarettes,” said Frieden, “maybe making it more complicated to enforce smoke-free laws that protect all nonsmokers.”

The study also found that teens are drinking fewer sodas and less alcohol. They’re also getting into fewer fights, but condom use has also become less common.

, and most teens are still not eating a balanced diet. While most young people are spending fewer hours watching television, they’ve replaced it with time spent before a computer beyond school reasons.

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 July 2014 10:31

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PA alumna tells students how it is

*MEDICAL*

Rocky Mountain College

Stephanie (Ridgway) Hudson, who became a physician assistant in 2012 in the Rocky Mountain College Master of Physician Assistant Studies program, works in a general surgery practice as the first-ever PA among seven surgeons. Her coworkers say uniformly, “Why didn’t we do this before [have a PA]? It’s so much easier!” she said.

In June, she spoke to the class of 2015 before they begin their year of clinical rotations for their PA certification. “There are not enough primary care providers,” she said about the first years of her career. “More and more patients are coming in with the ACA [Affordable Care Act] – people who’d put off surgeries.”

She is in the operating room three days a week, usually for thoracic surgeries. “Wednesday is Whipple day,” she said, for the extensive surgeries that deal with cancers at the head of the pancreas. “What we can take apart and put together to create a functioning digestive system is just amazing.” Hudson is the first assistant and does teasing apart of blood vessels, cauterization and tying.

Being on call is the greatest opportunity, she said. “The first line is the PA. We decide ‘When does the doc need to be involved? Does the patient need to go to the OR now? What will they need, a central line?’”

“You guys are so much more prepared than the other guys out there,” she reiterated to the Rocky Mountain College students.

RMC President Bob Wilmouth taught Hudson when he directed the RMC MPAS program. He told the first-years, who head to rotations in August, “When you guys go out and knock it out, they see you guys and want a Rocky grad. It’s a pay-it-forward model, and it has worked here.”

Hudson and her husband, Jeff (’10 MPAS), found dual PA careers in Vancouver, Wash. He joined a private practice in orthopedic surgery and trauma after a one-year Chicago residency in which he worked 80 to 100 hours a week. A surgeon in his current practice had endured the same residency, so they hired him for a job he might not have otherwise qualified for.

Back in the RMC classroom, she did not hesitate to rapid-fire quiz current grad students. “What are the indications for a cholesystectomy [gall bladder removal]? What are the most common complications [of the surgery]? So what would you do in that case?” she asked.

Her questions all came from her experiences. Students’ faces brightened as they saw the parallel thought processes of their revered instructors and of an alumna. “Offer to take call on all your rotations,” she said, because RMC students learn as much as anyone can.

Hudson’s advice for clinical year? Without any notes, she rattled off “Always be early and always dress professionally, even before surgery. Prepare before exams. Always wear the white coat. Be willing to document fully. Enjoy the specialty. Find an answer before anyone asks you again. And don’t hesitate to share questions – they’re all waiting for you to ask.”

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 July 2014 10:34

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RiverStone accredited

*MEDICAL*

RiverStone Health, Yellowstone County’s public health department, received accreditation notification from the Public Health Accreditation Board last month.

RiverStone Health is the first public health department in Eastern Montana to be nationally accredited and one of fewer than 50 health departments nationwide to earn PHAB accreditation. 

To receive accreditation, a news release said, a health department must undergo a rigorous, multi-faceted, peer-reviewed assessment process to ensure that it meets or exceeds a set of quality standards and measures.

There are more than 3,000 public health departments in the United States, and hundreds are seeking national accreditation. RiverStone Health and the Missoula City-County Health Department are the only two local health departments accredited in Montana, although several other local health departments in the state are working toward accreditation. 

The PHAB voluntary accreditation program works to improve and protect the health of the public by advancing the performance of the nation’s Tribal, state, local and territorial public health departments, the news release said. PHAB, which launched in 2011 after more than a decade of development, is jointly funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 July 2014 10:31

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‘Dire Wolf’ doesn’t work

*BOOKS*

“Dire Wolf,” by Eric Jubb. Self-published. Paperback, 493 pages.

By DAVID CRISP - The Billings Outpost

You really can’t judge a book by its cover. “Dire Wolf,” a new Montana-based novel by Eric Jubb, has a handsome cover with a wolf looking balefully at the reader. The back cover is a lovely shot of Flathead Lake.

It’s what’s in between those covers that causes problems. It’s a promising enough story about an ancient breed of canines that come back to haunt modern Montana and about a wounded veteran who is trying to stop the attacks. But the writing just doesn’t get the job done.

Mr. Jubb  relies heavily on dialogue for exposition, which would be tough to pull off even if the dialogue were better. But the dialogue is nowhere near enough to carry the story.

Much of it reads about like this:

“Thanks, Gavin, for the ice cream.”

“You’re welcome, Feather. I’ll see you in the next day or two.”

This is not the sort of dialogue that leaves one hungering for more.

Mr. Jubb does have basic skills, and he seems to have a knack for original ideas. But he still has an apprenticeship to serve before turning out a novel that is worth your time.

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 July 2014 10:42

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